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fuckyeahsexcriminals:


SEX CRIMINALS #9
story: MATT FRACTION
art / cover: CHONG ZRPY
OCTOBER 16 / 32 PAGES / FC / M / $3.50
Suze and Jon meet Ana. Or rather, meet Ana AGAIN. Or should we say, meet…Ms. Jazmine St. Cocaine AGAIN. Did we just put those words in that order in PREVIEWS? Yes. Yes we did. By MATT FRACTION (SEX CRIMINALS) and CHONNY ZDARKO (SEX CRIMINALS).

Image Comics Solicitations for October 2014

fuckyeahsexcriminals:

SEX CRIMINALS #9

story: MATT FRACTION

art / cover: CHONG ZRPY

OCTOBER 16 / 32 PAGES / FC / M / $3.50

Suze and Jon meet Ana. Or rather, meet Ana AGAIN. Or should we say, meet…Ms. Jazmine St. Cocaine AGAIN. Did we just put those words in that order in PREVIEWS? Yes. Yes we did. By MATT FRACTION (SEX CRIMINALS) and CHONNY ZDARKO (SEX CRIMINALS).

Image Comics Solicitations for October 2014

The TRUE BELIEVER Awards

The London Film and Comic Con 2014 held the True Believer Awards ceremony over the weekend. Kelly Sue and I couldn’t attend but, nominated for a few things, we sent a joint statement just in case someone had to read  something on our behalf.

Turns out I, or books of which I am a part, won five. “Favorite Rising Star: Writer,” “Favorite Writer,” “Favorite Cover” for HAWKEYE #9, “Favorite Single Story” for HAWKEYE #11, and “Favorite Reprint Compilation” for that big honkin’ HAWKEYE book. 

The statement we sent:

It’s been a difficult for us personally, with loss visiting our family extra often this spring. Tragedy’s common traveling companion is Perspective, though, and that latter leaves us profoundly grateful for the lives we have — our surviving family, our children, the vocation we share and the tremendous community of love and support that we have found in this industry.  From the insanely-gifted artists who have shared their lives and talents so courageously and so generously, to the fans, whose stories and energy inspire us daily. Thank you.

Which I think says it all.

Casanova step-by-step

10paezinhos:

This week, both Bá and I did new original drawings for the annual CBLDF auction that takes place in San Diego during Comic Con. We took some time from our crazy-busy schedules (made even crazier by the fact that World Cup is going on just outside our studio window) and created two new images with characters we have created. TFAW, who always helps coordinate this, will make prints of the images that the artists will be able to keep and sell, so I decided to make a full color image that would make a great 10 x 17 print.

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My first idea was to do a Sugarshock image. Everybody seems to really love those characters, and you could say that right now Joss Whedon, writer of Sugarshock and nowadays writer and director of the Avengers movies, has never been as popular. I sketched the characters on my notebook and started working on the final image, but something wasn’t clicking and I wasn’t happy with where I was going with the drawing. I decided to call it a day and get back to it the next morning, and I’m glad I did.

Next morning, I went looking for inspiration at one of my sources: Pinterest. I used to keep thousands of images in folders on my computer, but nowadays it’s much easier to keep everything I think might inspire an illustration or a story on my Pinterest page. If you go check it out, you’ll find elements of my recent CMKY stories for Vertigo, as well as research for the short Hellboy story, and many other images from across the internet that I keep in handy to mix up in my head when I’m at the drawing board.

The new wave of inspirational images made me decide to change characters, and the drawing became a Casanova image. It’s easier to imagine Casanova in any situation, anywhere, with anyone. Much more pleased with this second sketch, I showed it to Bá:

"It’s great", he said, "but lose the cheetah and the boat". I agreed and started working on the final piece.

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I took pictures of the process to post on twitter, and it’s a great way to see the way I was thinking visually, how I left many decisions for the inking stage, how I helped to make the characters pop by using cool darker colors on the background, how the red elements united the characters, how dripping and large expressive brushstrokes help give it a “drawing” look, a “hand-made” look.

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After it was done, dry and ready, I scanned it, adjusted the colors on photoshop and sent it over by email. The original will be going with me to San Diego, where I shall say farewell to this painting, hoping it will find a great new home on the collection of some lucky fan. 

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NAUSICAÄ Of The Full Bleed

Out of the roughly 1071 pages of comics that make up Miyazaki’s NAUSICAÄ OF THE VALLEY OF THE WIND, there is, exactly, one panel without a border (called, sometimes, “full bleed” although in a black and white book like this, I’m not sure the same would apply, and besides, it’s manga and i have no idea what the fuck they call anything over there. I was struck by it precisely because it stood out, because it was so exceedingly rare amongst its, what, ten-thousand companion panels. I noticed it because it took my breath for a half-second. 

It’s the panel in question is the second panel on the very first page. 
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What does knocking out the panel border on panel two do? Why there, why that page, that panel, that choice, so early on? Why never again? What does it do for the page, the flow, the composition? What does it tell us about the character? The world? The time the story exists in, and across? What does the lack of border do to its relation to the panel that preceded it? To the panel that follows? What does it do to the rhythm of all three? of the whole page? How does it affect the composition? The sound of the page? The pace? How long is that moment? How long does she glide before that shadow falls over the skull structure? Why does Miyazaki allow panels 1, 2, and 3 to feel contiguous but elide so much between 3 and 4? And does that change panel 2 at all then, that elision? Does the ‘camera’ move between 1 and 2? are you sure?
Was the elimination of the border deliberate or happenstance? Did Miyazaki not have his ground rules in place, not know his grammar? Did he just make it the fuck up, and it was page one so he didn’t know his shit yet, or, on the contrary, was it incredibly specific, incredibly deliberate? If you’re going to make an 1100 page comic book, do you come to page one without knowing what your tools are, or how they work? (I think of Kubrick, and the impossible space of the Overlook Hotel, and the baloon-deflating cynicism that suggests it was all happenstance, when literally every other piece of evidence regarding Kubrick’s process suggests otherwise). Is this a small thing? Is this a big thing? Is this the kind of thing I’ve ever thought about before? Is this the kind of thing I’ve thought about enough?  
Why the fuck not?